Two Ways to Add Checkbox Controls to a Word Document

Two Ways to Add Checkbox Controls to a Word Document

Microsoft Word has many features that can benefit any business. However, one feature that may not be used as often as it should be is the checkbox control. In this guide, you’ll learn two ways to add checkbox controls to your Word document in order to help you save time and communicate more effectively with your readers.

 Selecting the control

Checkboxes can be used to create interactive forms, surveys, and quizzes in Microsoft Word. To insert a checkbox control, click the Developer tab on the Ribbon. Then, click the Check Box Content Control button in the Controls group. This will insert a checkbox at your cursor’s location. The checkbox is selected by default.

Selecting the control: If you want to select an existing text box, then position your cursor within that text box before clicking the Check Box Content Control button. The formatting of a checked box is different from an unchecked one; for example, it is outlined with a thin black border that has rounded corners. There are two ways to format a checkbox control:

– by setting up properties using the Properties Pane

– or via formatting changes. You can also delete, copy, and paste controls as needed. When adding multiple controls, they’re formatted sequentially based on their insertion order. When adding a second control, if it goes after the first control (i.e., higher up), then it is formatted identically to the first control; if not, then its settings may change based on which type of content was added first (text or another checkbox).

-If you inserted text before inserting a checkbox, changing that text would also change the behavior of all following boxes (e.g., checking one would set all following boxes to checked) while doing so would not alter any following boxes inserted after another checkbox had been added.

Formatting the control

If you need to add multiple checkboxes to a Word document, there are two main ways to do it. You can either use the Developer tab or insert an ActiveX control. When using the Developer tab, choose Insert > Table and drag over three rows of three cells each. One row will be used for labels and the other for text boxes that represent each option. In the cells, type in your labels and then fill in with your text boxes below them. In this example we have four options:

Option 1, Option 2, Option 3 and Option 4. We can change these names by clicking on them once they’re highlighted and then typing in whatever we want them to say. For example, we could change Option 1 to say I want Option 1 instead of just displaying its name alone on top of the cell.

After filling in all four cells, click somewhere else on the screen so that the Developer tab disappears. Now right-click where one of the labels was and choose Format Control from the menu. From here, you’ll see a variety of formatting options like height, width, font size and color.

Clicking OK after making changes will update all four controls at once without having to highlight them individually first. Once again, make sure not to click anywhere else on the screen until after clicking OK if you don’t want those changes made only to one option rather than all four. A second way to format these same four options is to use an ActiveX control.

To add this control, go back into the Developer tab and select Create New Field (this will place another table with one row of four cells onto your document). Right-click inside any of the four cells that has been created and choose Properties from the dropdown menu. From here, select Check Boxes under Attributes and set Width to 100%.

Be sure to uncheck Linked Cells under Properties as well before clicking OK. These settings ensure that when the user selects one box it will automatically mark off the others in succession (e.g., checking off Option 1 would also mark off Options 2, 3 and 4)

. A third way to format these four boxes would be by adding an icon to each one. For instance, we could take our previous steps and put four icons such as images or icons representing each option. To do this, follow the steps above but choose Icon Button from the attribute list.

The Icon Editor window will open up where you can search for whichever icon you want – we recommend using specific ones like radio button symbols so that it’s easier for users to know what function they serve – and resize them accordingly. When finished setting up the properties, click OK and all four options should show up on your document with corresponding icons next to them.

Adding multiple checkboxes

If you need to add multiple checkboxes to a Word document, there are two main ways to do it. You can either use the Developer tab or insert them as symbols. To do this in the Developer tab, go to Insert > Control > Check Box and then click and drag the mouse over where you want your boxes placed. You can also find these options under Form Objects on the Insert ribbon menu.

To create checkboxes by inserting symbols, go to Insert > Symbols on the Ribbon menu and then select Check Box from the Symbol gallery of icons. Selecting this will open up an empty box that you can move around and resize until you get it positioned where you want it on your document page.

If you need to have more than one box in a row, select the first one, hold down Shift+Ctrl (Windows) or Shift+Command (Mac) keys and then click-and-drag a second one onto the same row. In order for these checkboxes to work properly within Microsoft Word, be sure to save your file with .docx extension after formatting is complete.

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